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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

1 edition of A commentary on the Homeric hymn to Hermes found in the catalog.

A commentary on the Homeric hymn to Hermes

Athanassios Vergados

A commentary on the Homeric hymn to Hermes

by Athanassios Vergados

  • 315 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by De Gruyter in Berlin .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hymn to Hermes,
  • Greek poetry,
  • Homeric hymns,
  • History and criticism

  • Edition Notes

    StatementAthanassios Vergados
    SeriesTexte und Kommentare, Texte und Kommentare
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA4023.Z5 V474 2012
    The Physical Object
    Paginationpages. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25340174M
    ISBN 109783110259698
    LC Control Number2012021511

    1. The Homeric Hymns Hymn to Apollo Hymn to Hermes Hymn to Aphrodite The Homeric Hymns and Hellenistic poetry Transmission of the text-- Sigla-- Text-- Commentary-- Bibliography-- Indexes. (source: Nielsen Book Data) Summary These lively narrative poems, attributed in antiquity to Homer, are works of great charm. The "Homeric Hymn to Hermes" Introduction, Text and Commentary. Series:Texte und Kommentare See all formats and pricing Book Book Series. Previous chapter. € / $ / £ Get Access to Full Text. Citation Information. 3. Humour in the Homeric Hymn to Hermes (). The "Homeric Hymn to Hermes": Introduction, Text and.

    This volume offers a detailed philological commentary on the longest of the Homeric Hymns. The commentary is preceded by a lengthy introduction addressing the Hymn’s ideas on poetry and music, its humorous aspects, the poem’s relation to the rest of archaic hexameter literature, its reception in later literature, its structure, date and place of composition, and the question of its.   Hermes. Born in a cave, the son of Zeus and the nymph Maia, Hermes was “a son, of many shifts, blandly cunning, a robber, a cattle driver, a bringer of dreams, [15] a watcher by night, a thief at the gates, one who was soon to show forth wonderful deeds among the deathless gods” (Homeric Hymn (4) to Hermes, Evelyn-White translation.).

    The Iliad and the Odyssey depict conflict where consensus should reign, as do the other major poems of the early Greek hexameter tradition: Hesiod's Theogony and the Homeric Hymns describe divine clashes that unbalance the cosmos; Hesiod's Works and Days stems from a quarrel between brothers.   The Homeric Hymm to Hermes; introduction, text and commentary. Vergados, Athanassios. De Gruyter pages $ Hardcover Texte und Kommentare; 41 PA For students of Greek literature, this study details the Hymn's .


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A commentary on the Homeric hymn to Hermes by Athanassios Vergados Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Hymn to Hermes, while surely the most amusing of the so-called Homeric Hymns, also presents an array of challenging problems.

In just lines, the newborn god invents the lyre and sings a hymn to himself, travels from Cyllene to Pieria to steal Apollo’s cattle, organizes a feast at the river Alpheios where he serves the meat of two of the stolen animals, cunningly defends his innocence. The Hymn to Hermes, while surely the most amusing of the so-called Homeric Hymns, also presents an array of challenging problems.

In just lines, the newborn god invents the lyre and sings a hymn to himself, travels from Cyllene to Pieria to steal Apollo´s cattle, organizes a feast at the river Alpheios where he serves the meat of two of the stolen animals, cunningly defends his.

E-BOOK EXCERPT. My dissertation, 'A Commentary on the Homeric Hymn to Hermes,' falls into two parts. In the commentary proper I divide the text into smaller narrative units, each of which is introduced by a short passage laying out the main problems, the various answers proposed, and the solution I consider the most appropriate.

As Gemoll remarks (p. ), the hymn-writer could not have attributed the seven strings to Hermes, had not the cithara been long established in that form.

On the other hand, the hymn does not approach the childishness of the Batrachomachia (attributed to Pigres, circ.by Plutarch and Suidas), nor to the comic effects of fourth-century.

THE HOMERIC HYMN TO HERMES. The charming, amusing, much admired, and lengthy Hymn to Hermes (4) tells the story of the god’s birth and childhood. Zeus and Maia. Zeus joined in love with the beautiful nymph MAIA [meye'a] (MAEA) in a luxurious cave, and she bore the god HERMES. the Homeric Hymns, where any commentary should take account of the important insights of Vernant and his followers into Greek religion and myth.

Indeed, one of the most influential discussions of Hermes and of the Homeric Hymn to Hermes is Laurence Kahn’s book Hermès passe, a Paris dissertation examined by A commentary on the Homeric hymn to Hermes book Vernant and Vidal-Naquet.

His previous work includes an edition of The Homeric Hymn to Demeter (); The Illiad: A Commentary. Volume VI: Books (Cambridge University Press, ); and Hesperos: Studies in Ancient Greek Poetry presented to M.

West on his Seventieth Birthday (co-edited with P. Finglass and C. Collard, ). After a general introduction to modern scholarship on the Homeric Hymns, the essays of the first part of the book examine in detail aspects of the longer narrative poems in the collection, while those of the second part give critical attention to the shorter poems and to the collection as a whole.

This volume offers a detailed philological commentary on the longest of the Homeric Hymns. The commentary is preceded by a lengthy introduction addressing the Hymn’s ideas on poetry and music, its humorous aspects, the poem’s relation to the rest of archaic hexameter literature, its reception in later literature, its structure.

Get this from a library. The Homeric hymn to Hermes: introduction, text and commentary. [Athanassios Vergados] -- "The Hymn to Hermes, while surely the most amusing of the so-called Homeric Hymns, also presents an array of challenging problems.

In just lines, the newborn god invents the lyre and sings a hymn. The Commentary brings out the individual character of each Hymn, by analyzing in depth its language and literary qualities, and also its religious and historical aspects.

The aim is to make these Hymns more accessible to students of Greek literature, and help them to appreciate the poems more fully as major works of early Greek s: 3.

"The Hymn to Hermes, while surely the most amusing of the so-called Homeric Hymns, also presents an array of challenging problems.

In just lines, the newborn god invents the lyre and sings a hymn to himself, travels from Cyllene to Pieria to steal Apollo's cattle, organizes a feast at the river Alpheios where he serves the meat of two of the stolen animals, cunningly defends his innocence.

A Commentary on the Homeric Hymn to Hermes (Texte Und Kommentare) (Texte Und Kommentare: Eine Altertumswissenschaftliche Reihe) By Athanassios Vergados The Hymn to Hermes, while surely the most amusing of the so-called Homeric Hymns, also presents an array of challenging problems.

In just lines, the newborn god invents the lyre and sings a. The lengthy Homeric Hymn to Demeter (2) provides the most important and complete information about DEMETER [de-mee'ter] (CERES) and PERSEPHONE [per-sef'o-nee] (PROSERPINA), daughter of Zeus and Demeter, and is in itself a literary gem.

The Abduction of Persephone. Persephone, the daughter of Zeus and Demeter, was also called KORE [ko'ree] (“girl” or “maiden”). The Homeric Hymns (Greek: Ὁμηρικοὶ Ὕμνοι, Homērikoi Hymnoi) are a collection of thirty-three anonymous ancient Greek hymns celebrating individual gods.

The hymns are "Homeric" in the sense that they employ the same epic meter—dactylic hexameter—as the Iliad and Odyssey, use many similar formulas and are couched in the same dialect. They were uncritically attributed to. The Homeric Hymn to Demeter, composed in the late seventh or early sixth century B.C.E., is a key to understanding the psychological and religious world of ancient Greek poem tells how Hades, lord of the underworld, abducted the goddess Persephone and how her grieving mother, Demeter, the goddess of grain, forced the gods to allow Persephone to return to her for part.

This volume offers a detailed philological commentary on the longest of the Homeric Hymns. The commentary is preceded by a lengthy introduction addressing the Hymn's ideas on poetry and music, its humorous aspects, the poem's relation to the rest of archaic hexameter literature, its reception in later literature, its structure, date and place of composition, and the question of its transmission.

Preview. Publisher’s Preview. This “Green and Yellow” commentary on three of the four longer Homeric Hymns effectively supplants the treatment of them in the full edition of Allen, Halliday and Sikes.

It also complements the larger-scale commentary by Richardson himself on the Hymn to Demeter and that by Faulkner, one of his doctoral students, on the Hymn to Aphrodite. 1 Richardson. There is therefore nothing in the language of Thucydides to suggest that he knew of a “Delian” hymn ending at lineand on the other hand, as Gemoll observes, the historian would hardly have written “ τοῦ προοιμίου Ἀπόλλωνος ”, if he had been acquainted with more than one Homeric hymn.

The "Homeric Hymn to Hermes" by Athanassios Vergados Book Resume: This volume offers a detailed philological commentary on the longest of the Homeric Hymns.

The commentary is preceded by a lengthy introduction addressing the Hymn’s ideas on poetry and music, its humorous aspects, the poem’s relation to the rest of archaic hexameter. INTRODUCTION-- TEXT-- COMMENTARY.

(source: Nielsen Book Data) Summary The Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite, which tells of the seduction of the shepherd Anchises by the love-goddess Aphrodite, has long been recognized as a masterpiece of early Western literature.The article reviews the book "The Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite and Related Texts: Text, Translation and Commentary" by Douglas Olson, volume 39 of the Texte und Kommentare book series.

Three Homeric Hymns: To Apollo, Hermes, and Aphrodite. Chappell, Mike // Exemplaria Classica;, Vol. 15, p The article reviews the book "Three Homeric Hymns.The Homeric hymn is a traditional form of praise poetry.

Employing traditional diction, theme, and structure, the hymn presents an epiphany of the god and an aetiology of his or her powers.

[] The traditional rhetoric of the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite is, however, subversive of the genre, producing a complex and ambiguous αἴτιον “cause” that both praises and blames its goddess.